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abraham lincoln rejected any meaningful compromise. following his election as president november of 1860, the country was gripped by a crisis because many feared lincoln and his republican party. the republican party was a number party and proudly so. they didn't have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single vote from any of the 15 states and only four of the state's, missouri, kentucky and the delaware did he get any popular routes and nearly a handful to read for the first time in the nation's history a party without any notable component would be taking over the executive branch of the government. but there was no more. the republican party was ousted during his brief existence it was cited in the mid to 1850's and its rhetoric had insulted us all and the institution as racial slavery than the determination that the republicans' determination morph into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support the republicans repeatedly condemned the south as on progressive, undemocratic, and american. with of this party on the threshold of
the election is important. they ton either candidate will take in office will affect what happens with education. >> paul, you wrote in the new york times magazine the obama before he was elected and the obama in the white house having different towns about posture. using the changes if he gets a second term? goes back to the tone he had before? >> i wrote about his policies around poverty and he stopped talking about poverty the last couple years. i would like to think he would go back to poverty in 2007. .. >> the low-income population grew 71%. the english language learning population grew 169%. these are the issues we have to address in this state. thank you all for joining us up. [laughter] >> this event took place at the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information about the festival visit texasbookfestival.org. >> brooke stoddard joined booktv at george mason university in virginia to talk about his book, "world in the balance." mr. stoddard was one of the authors appearing at the fall for the book festival, held annually at the university. this is
of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. hillary writes in her own memoir, as if her child were idyllic. but it wasn't. her mother dorothy was an amazing human being, her mother was born to a 15-year-old and a 17-year-old. they were in los angeles and when she was 8 years old her parents put her and her 3-year-old brother on a train by themselves to go back from los angeles to chicago. she continues to be mistreated
about the process of holding elections in the territory. they argued about a recently-conducted census. babbitt, rather unwisely, took issue with young's conduct of such matters. and by the end of the meeting, brigham young unloaded his fury on babbitt. this is what he said. if you sewer fear with any of -- interfere with any of my dictation in the elections, it will be the last time. now i don't want to hear you say this is not right, that is not right. you are nothing but a stinking politician. i know more about sound questions and doctrine and law than you. i am not willing to suffer this people to be interrupted. you are rotten now with gentilism. and the lord only knows what. i despise it as i despise the gates of hell. you ought to say that mormonism is my controller. my governorship and everything else is to bow down to mormon itch. mormonism. it wouldn't have been all that remarkable for brigham young to have browbeaten a member who was not acting in the church's best interests, but young had a larger purpose in mind. he delivered this harangue in the presence of the territory'
with a government official whether elected or appointed, and protested or done other things we think of as more outside, all of these things you are more likely to do if you occupy a more privileged space in society. that means right now demographic characteristics, democracy determining democracy, determining who actually has power as a citizen and that is fundamentally anti-democratic. we should not be able to predict who has civic and political power based on the color of somebody's skin, the language they speak at home or how much money they earn or how much wealth they have in the bank. as a proud graduate of the austin independent school district, i really came to understand my student's opportunities and my own fellow student's opportunities as being structured not only by what academic achievement they have but the ways in which they are able to seize civil and political power in order to fight for democracy and justice on their own behalf and on others's behalf because ultimately it is something to be one child rising about of poverty and escaping the neighborhood which means leaving b
. there is an elective, but he never took it. that was interesting. i also traced his military education and his experience at princeton. which was one of his most formative experiences. one reason he really tries to influence individuals. so that their family looked at was his experiences. not only the typical military experiences, but his experience in haiti, which was a nationbuilding exercise, which is where he had his first rule of law development. we look at his experience in bosnia where he was greatly exposed to the intelligence community and special operations command after the mission switched from hunting were chairs to hunting terrorists. he helped to spearhead this. he was with the green berets and the special ops community. the rangers and delta force, the first time those two communities have the same mission. this is important as his future commander in iraq. but he was out there in a baseball cap and after the guys who go in and knock on the doors, he went and delivered letters and in his oral history interview, which i conducted with michael hammond from the brookings institute
is first elected to congress and he writes letters from his first trip abroad, the letters are filled with all these visions -- what is going to happen when we come that? this wonderful nursery, check out the ship, have this nursery, we can take trisha down there. we can see the sights of europe. for years he promised to take her to europe. it didn't actually happen as a vacation until 1963. he was still promising it was going to happen. does that answer your question? i think we have time for one more question. >> i would be curious to know a little bit about her family, in nevada. what did her father do, why move to california? what were his parents like, what were her mother's parents like? >> we're getting into a tricky area. her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had to travel around -- she did a lot of things. he would talk about his good ventures. he had been made minor. term mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child and stayed and eventually married a man named bender. we
quality and low credit quality. we have an election to weeks from today. america has the clear choice. will they agree to such a system or let the private sector manage on its own? just look and north dakota where the unemployment rate it is 3% because of the hydro fracturing going on with privately-held land. every state wants to be like north dakota. it it is interesting mitt romney would devolve decisions whether to explore on land so virginia was still look for oil could do so. that was revoked by the obama administration ever alaska wants to do more exploration. everybody once again sources of energy in their states' also to have manufacturing companies it seems clear. i would like to thank you for listening and i would be happy to take any questions. [applause] >> among the natural guest reserves and by some fluke you have governor cuomo with the potential for hydro-fracking and the decision would you say? >> look at the example of pennsylvania they have not experienced environmental problems. with your budget deficit it is seems obvious that hydro-fracking it is the way to go.
to bring complete honor to his family. he already by the age of 17 has planned to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas and as president of the united states. this is something which everyone knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate and goes to oxford. he is an incredibly success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women, his mother direction to what the beauty queens, who are the ones flirtatious, who are attractive, and that's really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> in his memoir, "joseph anton," salman rushdie recounts the fatwa issued against him by ayatollah khomeini in 1989 for mr. rushdie's novel, "the satanic verses" which was deemed quote against islam, the prophet and the koran. this is about an hour 20. >> tha
nixon/kennedy debate,. , and magazine issues would be in advance of a presidential election that would preview the eight or ten or 12. and it struck me after see some many issues, women were not making it on that list. they were not thought to be presidential. they fought for some reason not to be presidential contender. as an academic you ask why and that for me was the origin of the book. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> for the next 45 minutes juan williams presents the history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. in this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us at the heritage foundation. we welcome those who joined us on our heritage.org web site on these occasions. we ask everyone in the house if he would be so kind as to check cellphones one last time and see that they are turned off. amazing how many speakers start doing that. we will post a program on our web site within 24 hours for your future re
to federal candidates and parties contributing almost half a billion dollars in the election cycle 2007/2008 alone. the financial services industry to offense used its clout to lobby for government policies that ultimately hurt rather than benefited major financial firms. it was the way the fannie mae and freddie mac pot for bought for years against more capable supervision to and standards that might save them from making the bad decisions that destroyed the two companies in 2008. the industry's political strength impeded other supervisory actions as well such is the effort of regulators to try to limit excessive lending concentrations in nontraditional mortgages or commercial real estate. the question then becomes whether from the perspective of organization and management there is any major recommendation that if well implemented what if it allowed more firms to survive? the literature on decision-making in large organizations actually yields an answer. sidney crinkle stein of the tuck school of business at dartmouth and his colleagues analyzed decision-making enlarge organizations.
face an election in which one party vows to repeal even those modest gains for quality in health coverage. the fight for health security in the united states is far from over. while all other affluent nations agreed long ago that basic health care should be the right of all citizens, the u.s. continues to treat medical care as a product to be purchased in the marketplace. even now the most sweeping reform in our history embodies this tension between the rights of the people and the rights of private companies and individuals to profit from the health care system. the three women i described in the stock lived at different times are in different parts of the country. it did not know each other and never heard of each other. but what all three of them have in common was their belief that ordinary citizens could take the lead in preventing a new vision of what our health care system could be. i think that all three of them would hope that the affordable care act, despite its flaws, would lead to a continuing and open participatory national debate about how the american health care s
to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now in your book "american tapestry," you put the focus on michele obama. tell us about how you got started doing that and what inspired you. >> i was writing about the first lady and the first family for the new york times which was something of an unusual assignment. typically the first family is covered by the white house reporters who chased the president around on air force one and in the briefing room and write about the first lady or first family when they have time that there was a sense in 2008 at the new york times and other newspapers too that we might want to do things differently and this first african-american family living in this house, this white house bill in part by slave labor, with slave labor would be written about regeneration to come and we wanted it to be part of documenting and chronicling that story. in january, before the inauguration, one of my colleagues was writing an article about the president and his rainbow family and we realize th
that in the beginning you have this very romantic kind of relationship. even when first elected to congress from the first trip abroad, letters are filled with visions for what's going to happen when we come back. they have this wonderful nursery. i have this nursery we can take trisha down there. we'll go see out of europe. for years he promised to take her to europe and it didn't actually happen as a vacation until 1963. but he was so promising it's going to happen. does that answer your question quite i think we have time for just one more question. >> and be curious to know a little bit about her family in nevada. why did he move to california? what were his parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so father was the son of irish immigrant and he had traveled around as an itinerant without a lot of different things. he was kind of talk to her about the adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child, ended up staying and eventually married a man nam
and hampshire and first openly gay person elected present his argument for a marriage. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. i think of this very sophisticated place but sure you had better things to do on a friday night. really. [laughter] i am delighted that i was your choice tonight. i am just really very honored and it's a special privilege to be introduced by patrick. he is one of my favorite people in the whole world doing some great things. if you haven't bought his book, buy it now. it's fantastic. do we have people here? any harvard people here? okay. well, i am really pleased to be doing this book right now. i have to admit i didn't have time to write a book. i had a day job at least until the end of this year and i retired and i got a call from desmond tutu's the person who heard me talking about the marriage and we thought this sounds really reasonable and he said i think you've got a book and you. and i said really i don't have time for ret. so we talked about whether or not i should find a ghost writer or something and so there was this wonderful writer who ha
tv.org. >> gene robinson of the episcopal diocese of new hampshire's and first openly gay person elected to be episcopate presents his arguments for gay marriage. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. i think of cambridge as a very sophisticated place but surely you have better things to do on a friday night, really. i am delighted that i was your choice tonight. i am really very honored and it is a special privilege to be introduced by patrick. he is one of my favorite people in the whole world and he is doing some great things and if you haven't bought his book, by it now. is fantastic. welcome. we have pds people here? yes. any harvard people here? yes, oh yes, okay. i am really pleased to be doing this book right now. i have to admit i didn't have time to write a book. i have this day job running a diocese at least until the end of this year when i retire. and i got a call from desmond tutu's book agent who had heard me on and p are talking about gay marriage and he thought this sounds really reasonable and so on and he said i think you have a booking you. and i said i
ranging from some solid research to jewish voting patterns in presidential elections to human rights in north korea in such publications as "the new york times," "wall street journal" and "washington post." for purposes today, should be noted jay served as special envoy for human rights under president george w. bush and in that position, she was known for his forthright criticism that simply the north korean tyranny, but also china and occasionally in south korea for failing to do more to assist north korean refugees and their fight to freedom. she did not spare criticism either of the folks at foggy bottom. he was on him for criticizing state department policies that seem more concerned about preserving the six party talks on north korea's nuclear program and step in the nuclear program itself for promoting human rights in the country. without any further ado ladies and gentlemen can get a warm hudson institute welcome to jay lefkowitz. [applause] >> thank you, can put a warm and gracious introduction. it's a pleasure to be here with all of you today for what promises to be a fasci
it. this. from 1964 to 2008, it is a period -- a president elected from those years from 1964 to 2008, they were from the sun belt states. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. it ends this forty-year period. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed. it tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense and in opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise policy. also it is in the sun belt, the south and southwest of the see the sunrise of the 1970s to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist voters. national defense, he was a staunch economist who played an important role in populist politics in the late 50s and early 1960s. one of the things that led this to switch parties in 1964. he was opposing labor unions.
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18